A Few Thoughts on Waiting

Once again, we’re fasting tomorrow for God to give the gift of marriage to those of us who desire it; strengthen men to love, serve and marry women; and show us where we need to change and give us grace to do so. Some are fasting lunch, some all day, and some are fasting something other than food. However God leads you to fast and pray, we encourage you to find a friend to pray with!

This week I wanted to share a post that one of the group sent to us that I found very encouraging. Its a terrific meditation on waiting- something I dare say everyone in different seasons of life, has experienced: waiting for a date, child, husband, job, grandchildren…Life is full of waiting.

-Anne

Spiritual Muscle Development
by Paul Tripp

http://www.desiringgod.org/blog/posts/spiritual-muscle-development

So, what happens inside of you when you are asked to wait? Is waiting, for you, a time of strengthening or weakening? Have you ever stopped to consider why God asks you to wait?  Let me point you to one of his purposes.

Waiting Is Giving You Time

When God asks you to wait, what happens to your spiritual muscles? While you wait, do your spiritual muscles grow bigger and stronger or do they grow flaccid and atrophied? Waiting for the Lord isn’t about God forgetting you, forsaking you, or being unfaithful to his promises. It’s actually God giving you time to consider his glory and to grow stronger in faith. Remember, waiting isn’t just about what you are hoping for at the end of the wait, but also about what you will become as you wait.

Waiting always presents me with a spiritual choice-point. Will I allow myself to question God’s goodness and progressively grow weaker in faith, or will I embrace the opportunity of faith that God is giving me and build my spiritual muscles? (see Psalm 27:4)

It’s so easy to question your belief system when you are not sure what God is doing. It’s so easy to give way to doubt when you are being called to wait. It’s so easy to forsake good habits and to take up habits of unfaith that weaken the muscles of the heart. Let me suggest some habits of unfaith that cause waiting to be a time of increasing weakness rather than of building strength. These are bad habits that all of us are tempted to give way to.

Habits of Unfaith

Giving way to doubt. There’s a fine line between the struggle to wait and giving way to doubt. When you are called to wait, you are being called to do something that wasn’t part of your plan and is therefore something that you struggle to see as good. Because you are naturally convinced that what you want is right and good, it doesn’t seem loving that you are being asked to wait. You can see how tempting it is then to begin to consider questions of God’s wisdom, goodness, and love.  It is tempting, in the frustration of waiting, to actually begin to believe that you are smarter than God.

Giving way to anger. It’s very easy to look around and begin to think that the bad guys are being blessed and the good guys are getting hammered (see Psalm 73). There will be times when it simply doesn’t seem right that you have to wait for something that seems so obviously good to you. It will feel that you are being wronged, and when it does, it seems right to be angry. Because of this, it’s important to understand that the anger you feel in these moments is more than anger with the people or circumstances that are the visible cause for your waiting. No, your anger is actually anger with the One who is in control of those people and those circumstances. You are actually giving way to thinking that you have been wronged by God.

Giving way to discouragement. This is where I begin to let my heart run away with the “If only_____,” the “What if_____,” and the “What will happen if_____.” I begin to give my mind to thinking about what will happen if my request isn’t answered soon, or what in the world will happen if it’s not answered at all. This kind of meditation makes me feel that my life is out of control. And I am able to think my life is out of control because I have forgotten God’s wise and gracious control over very part of my existence. Rather than my heart being filled with joy, my heart gets flooded with worry and dread. Free mental time is spent considering my dark future, with all the resulting discouragement that will always follow.

Giving way to envy. When I am waiting, it’s very tempting to look over the fence and wish for the life of someone who doesn’t appear to have been called to wait. It’s very easy to take on an “I wish I were that guy” way of living. You can’t give way to envy without questioning God’s wisdom and his love. Here is the logic: if God really loves you as much as he loves that other guy, you would have what the other guy has. Envy is about feeling forgotten and forsaken, coupled with a craving to have what your neighbor enjoys.

Giving way to inactivity. The result of giving way to all of these things is inactivity. If God isn’t as good and wise as I once thought he was, if he withholds good things from his children, and if he plays favorites, then why would I continue to pursue him? Maybe all those habits of faith aren’t helping me after all; maybe I’ve been kidding myself.

Sadly, this is the course that many people take as they wait. Rather than growing in faith, their motivation for spiritual exercise is destroyed by doubt, anger, discouragement, and envy, and the muscles of faith that were once robust and strong are now atrophied and weak.

One of His Primary Shaping Tools

The reality of waiting is that it’s an expression of God’s goodness not empirical evidence against it. He is wise and loving. His timing is always right, and his focus isn’t so much on what you will experience and enjoy, but on what you will become. He is committed to using every tool at his disposal to rescue you from yourself and to shape you into the likeness of his Son. The fact is that waiting is one of his primary shaping tools.

So, how do you build your spiritual muscles during the wait? Well, you must commit yourself to resisting those habits of unfaith and with discipline pursue a rigorous routine of spiritual exercise.

What is the equipment in God’s gym of faith? Here are the things that he has designed for you to build the muscles of your heart and strengthen your resolve: the regular study of his Word; consistent godly fellowship; looking for God’s glory in creation every day; putting yourself under excellent preaching and teaching of Scripture; investing your quiet mental time in meditating on the goodness of God (e.g., as you are going off to sleep); reading excellent Christian books; and spending ample time in prayer. All of these things will result in spiritual strength and vitality.

Is God asking you to wait? So, what is happening to your muscles?

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5 Responses to A Few Thoughts on Waiting

  1. lesley says:

    Thank you for posting this article. Some years ago God instructed me to “wait”, and I am finally beginning to understand why, and what my part is in the waiting process. Yes, the waiting can be hard at times, but God is sovereign and good, and His plan for my life is in action, even though sometimes it doesn’t feel that way. Thanks again.

  2. Julie says:

    This was a wonderful and insightful explanation of waiting on God. To believe that God knows best and acts in our best interests, yet doubt Him when we are waiting is a contradiction so many of us struggle with. Thank you for posting this encouraging article.

  3. Theresa says:

    Waiting can be a process that reveals what we REALLY believe. I remember God saying to me one day when I was struggling with something: “Um, yeah, this is the faith part.”

    Having real faith when everyting arounds us seems to say the opposite of what we choose to believe. Not faith in our circumstances, but being convinced that God is good, no matter what.

    Ouch.

  4. jannette says:

    Thank you for this inspirational reminder that even our waiting can and will be used for God’s good.

  5. connally says:

    Wow, I really needed to hear this. It’s amazing. I have been co-leading this weekly e-mail reflection initiative (now blog) for 3.5 years, and I find I’m still the one who really NEEDS to hear the content that we generate.

    Thanks, Anne, for posting; thanks, Julia, for sending; thanks, Paul Tripp, for writing it originally.

    Connally

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